Postnatal exposure to synthetic predator odor (TMT) induces quantitative modification in fear-related behaviors during adulthood without change in corticosterone levels.

Abstract : Environmental stimuli and adverse experiences in early life may result in behavioral and physiological changes in adulthood. In several animal species, the odors cues are crucial in the setting of adaptive behaviors, especially towards predators. However, little is known about the effects of postnatal exposure to predator odor on the later physiological and behavioral responses to this natural stressor. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a postnatal exposure to synthetic predator odor (TMT) in mice pups on later adult fear-related behaviors and corticosterone levels in response to this specific stimulus. Pups postnatally exposed to only water showed later in adult life behavioral responses when exposed to TMT that were statistically different from mice that were exposed as neonates to TMT. In addition, mice exposed as neonates to TMT showed a decrease of fear-related behaviors while no differences occurred in the corticosterone levels between both groups.
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https://hal-univ-bourgogne.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00681380
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Soumis le : mercredi 21 mars 2012 - 13:29:09
Dernière modification le : vendredi 19 octobre 2018 - 11:48:03

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R. Hacquemand, G. Pourie, L. Jacquot, G. Brand. Postnatal exposure to synthetic predator odor (TMT) induces quantitative modification in fear-related behaviors during adulthood without change in corticosterone levels.. Behavioural Brain Research, Elsevier, 2010, 215 (1), pp.58-62. ⟨10.1016/j.bbr.2010.06.024⟩. ⟨hal-00681380⟩

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