Embodiment and the origin of interval timing : kinematic and electromyographic data

Abstract : Recent evidence suggests that interval timing (the judgment of durations lasting from approximately 500 ms. to a few minutes) is closely coupled to the action control system. We used surface electromyography (EMG) and motion capture technology to explore the emergence of this coupling in 4-, 6-, and 8-month-olds. We engaged infants in an active and socially relevant arm-raising task with seven cycles and response period. In one condition, cycles were slow (every 4 s); in another, they were fast (every 2 s). In the slow condition, we found evidence of time-locked sub-threshold EMG activity even in the absence of any observed overt motor responses at all three ages. This study shows that EMGs can be a more sensitive measure of interval timing in early development than overt behavior.
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https://hal-univ-bourgogne.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01425263
Contributeur : Lead - Université de Bourgogne <>
Soumis le : mardi 3 janvier 2017 - 14:35:26
Dernière modification le : mardi 19 novembre 2019 - 09:37:03

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Caspar Addyman, Sinead Rocha, Lilian Fautrelle, Robert M. French, Elizabeth Thomas, et al.. Embodiment and the origin of interval timing : kinematic and electromyographic data. Experimental Brain Research, Springer Verlag, 2016, pp.1-8. ⟨10.1007/s00221-016-4842-y⟩. ⟨hal-01425263⟩

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